The beginning of passover break

This is another post written on a bus. This time we’re heading home from a school trip titled “yam le yam” or “sea to sea”. The idea is to hike from the Mediterranean to the Sea of Galilee, but in reality we did a couple day hikes inbetween driving from place to place. Regardless, it was a great few days and our hikes were gorgeous. The north of Israel is so refreshingly lush compared to the deserts in the south (which are beautiful in a different way).
After our hike on Friday, we had Shabbat dinner, lounged around and went to bed. Saturday was full of more lounging outside in the amazing weather, optional walks and a discussion on African immigration to Israel. Our hostel was a series of buildings on a big grassy plot of land that had an expansive overlook onto the surrounding scenery and the mountains that border Syria and Lebanon. Our Shabbat ended with a bonfire rightfully accompanied by singing and smores. We hiked this morning, and concluded the trip by pouring our water that we had gathered from the Mediterranean into the Sea of Galilee (yes it’s a thing) and swimming/lying in the sun.
As we drive back, I can’t help but be stressed thinking of all the things I have to do tonight before we leave. Leave where? Tomorrow to the Ben Gurion airport which will take us to Istanbul, Turkey. After four days in Turkey, we’ll head to Greece: Athens, Olympia, Mykanos, and Crete. Our last week will be spent in Cyprus. Our general plan can be summed up as “see cool history stuff, reenact Mama Mia, and hike while sustained on bread (matzah) cheese and Greek salads.” Needless to say I’m looking forward to it, if not purely for the sensation of spending three weeks away from a computer or classes. What a concept.
The only downsides to this soon-to-be realized Spring break (Passover break) is the impending doom of looking at my bank account and the fact that when we get back, there will only be about a month left of school, which involves the final papers I’ve been avoiding. Time flies.




Filed under: Living in History

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